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20121213
20121213
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will be gone. massachusetts and connecticut will be out of the ski business completely. you can only adapt so much before you say the revenue is not there to keep the doors open. sandra: what are your forecasters telling you now about the coming year? obviously we just had, last winter was the fourth warmest on record since 1896. things should get better from that, right? >> well we sure hope so but we're looking at the long-term trend. when you look at climate change you can't predict individual weather patterns over the next week or the next month. we're looking at the long-term trend. up fortunately as you mentioned we're working on the first 11 months of this year are the hottest on record in the united states. we have to go after the problem the problem is industrial carbon pollution. we have to strike a blow against climate change. sandra: we have to leave it there, bob but i'm wondering, can't we just keep making snow? can't we put snow on those mountains you know? it is expensive i know. >> it's expensive. half a million dollars a year on average for a ski resort to make its own snow.
, connecticut. some towns are now on capitol hill today. they are painting a vivid picture of this massive damage done in nir communities. joining us live from the rotunda, hoboken mayor dawn zimmer. ufs you were testifying about how small businesses have struggled here. tell us about what's going on in hoboken, what do you need? >> part of my message is hoboken is very much open for business. we have fantastic restaurants and nightlife and shopping and washington street was not flooded. many of our businesses have been impacted by the closure of the path, 60%. some businesses are reporting as much as 60% down in business. my main concern is the 200 or so businesses off of washington street who are struggling to either stay open, operating in an alternate location or potentially over the next several months could be forced to close down. that's my focus right now. >> i understand there was $1 hundred million in damage in hoboken. what is the main source of revenue for helping people get back to work and get back to business? >> well, for businesses the only option for them from the federal
to an 18-year-old latino in los angeles, as a 65-year-old banker in greenwich, connecticut? >> doesn't that come down to the candidate? >> it comes down to everything. you know, the first rule of engagement is to engage. and just like last time i saw mika, she was dancing salsa at our reagan awards dinner, if you remember. >> wow! that's engagement. >> that's -- you know, that's a point. and i'm just not being -- i'm just not trying to bring levity into the equation. >> but you've got to engage! >> but you've got to engage. you know, when we have the republican national convention, what did i do? >> al, is it fair to say that if you've got a candidate that's dweeding america between 47% and 53%, that may not engage the way we need to engage? >> if you have a candidate who doesn't speak to 100% of america, he'll lose. someone won't buy it, but at least most americans will believe i may or may not vote for you, but i know you care. the most significant question asked in the polling data in the election i thought was, does so and so care for people like me? and if you're scoring 38%, yo
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